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Serving the Needs of Quakerism and the Cause of Peace

December 2018

Executive Director Jen KarstenAs you know, it is a joy to explore Pendle Hill in the fall. Seeing the sunlight magnifying the tree leaves’ yellows, reds, and oranges is a treat, and this season has been no different. The constancy of certain cycles of nature draws people to outdoor benches alongside our meadows, woodlands, and ponds. We provide space for connection with fresh air, nature’s hum, and Spirit in all seasons. Have you let nature restore you lately?

Pendle Hill in the fallIn all seasons, people travel to Pendle Hill to have their unique needs met. Some seek quiet stillness in a busy world. Others want to mix with new people and feel joined in an experience – study, grief, organizing, celebration, deep conversation, learning. Some feel spiritually rudderless and long to worship as often as possible. Many arrive to learn or teach ways of peace-making and how to become more effective in the broader movement. Pendle Hill provides sacred space for discernment to those working to find their place when social tensions rise and provoke.

Offering a Gently Tended Ecosystem, on Holy Ground
In the words of staff member Lloyd Guindon, “There are three reasons why I give to Pendle Hill: the bench, the bell, and the beech. The bench symbolizes our tradition of faith through daily worship since 1930. The ringing bell represents our call to community through the breaking of bread together, and the 300-year-old beech represents the ‘welcoming committee’ of trees that hold our sacred ground for all to come and do their important work.” If you would benefit from being in a community of seekers (and trees), please visit soon!

"Within and Without" conference speaker Anton Flores MaisonetMagnifying Beloved Community in Fraught Times
In a time when violence, and villainizing “the other,” are too common, Pendle Hill seeks the prophetic ministers among us to teach and those wanting to learn how to build real human community, real lasting peace, real democracy. Our recent conferences, Within and Without: Liberation Theology at Work in Social Movements and Truth and Healing: Quakers Seeking Right Relationship with Indigenous Peoples, and a workshop for Women Writers of Color, are just a few of the ways we’ve elevated conversation on important topics of our time. Our in-process renovations to add accessible ramps and bathrooms reflect our commitment to welcoming all people to our campus. If you haven’t yet read our recent Pendle Hill pamphlet, Humanity in the Face of Inhumanity by Sue Williams, it is one of many that we recommend.

Shannon Isaacs, Director of Advancement

Shannon Isaacs is Pendle Hill’s new Director of Advancement

A New Addition to Our Community
We are excited to welcome Shannon Isaacs to our staff as Director of Advancement. Shannon is a life-long Quaker and comes to us from her previous role as Director of Development at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. Shannon has served on the boards of Wilmington College, Friends General Conference, The Social Enterprise Alliance, The Association of Fundraising Professionals, and the City of Cincinnati Taskforce on Gender Equality, among others. She received the YWCA Rising Star award which honors women with a track record of leadership who have shown career success. Shannon is a graduate of Cornell University with a degree, with honors, in Industrial and Labor Relations. She has deep interests in Quakerism, social justice, and community and hopes to hear about your experience of Pendle Hill. She can be reached at sisaacs@pendlehill.org or 484-234-4499.

As the year winds down, I want to thank you for your ongoing involvement with Pendle Hill. Your participation and generosity have made our needed work (standing with the oppressed, offering restorative space, modeling a caring community, and serving Quakerism) possible this year. We are all grateful. We also have an opportunity for your end-of-year gift to go twice as far: This season you can double your impact through a matching gift challenge, in honor of Douglas and Dorothy Steere. $25 becomes $50, $500 becomes $1000 … up to $18,000! Will you consider a donation this season so that we can continue our 89-year experiment with community, equity, contemplation, learning to be peace practitioners, and enriching Quakerism? All contributions will be matched until we reach $18,000, so give soon to have your money reach twice as far.

I will be giving because a center that meets people “where they are,” and helps them go farther in their experience of inhabiting a more peaceful world, is a special thing. That Pendle Hill helps shape people and thus societies toward peace through justice is, to me, a treasure worthy of investment from all. Thank you; we hope to greet you here soon!

With Gratitude,

 

Jennifer Karsten,

Executive Director

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